STAFF EDITORIAL

Editors express discontent with Union affairs

The administration’s relationship with the students is absurd. We, the students, have been asking to be included in the changes that affect us. First with Summer Arch, then the athletics budgeting changes, and now the Executive Director for Student Activities job posting. It is difficult, if not impossible, to welcome significant changes to Student Life when students are excluded until the process is on its way to completion. We go to a school with students who are passionate and proud of their Union. It makes us unique, and we are proud of being the only completely student-run Union in the United States. For an institute that touts the caliber and leadership abilities of its students, one would hope that we would be included in changes that so greatly affect us.

Back in September 2015, with the announcement of Summer Arch, The Polytechnic tried fruitlessly to interview members of the administration about student concerns over the program’s implementation. We wrongly believed that the administration would listen and include the student body on the next issue to come along.

Then, in early February, the administration announced that the Union would be relieved of its athletics budgeting responsibilities, citing Middle States Commission on Higher Education and NCAA compliance. We accepted this, hoped to be informed sooner the next time, and moved on.

Now comes the job posting for Executive Director for Student Activities. Of the three, one would hope that students would be involved in this process. The new Executive Director will be expected to “provide leadership for a broad portfolio of co-curricular programs including the Student Union, Student Government, and Campus Recreation,” yet no students or student leaders even knew of the posting before it made its way to Reddit several days later. Despite our asking twice this year to be included in the discussion of matters that affect us, we have been neglected once again.

Nothing tests our patience more than having a change, good or bad, thrust upon us. Our opinions have become mere afterthoughts to schemes in motion. Looking at how the administration has handled student relations in the past year is laughable. We have been told that “this is the best thing for students, even if students may not realize it at the time.” To us, that sounds like a dismissive phrase a parent might tell their child. Administration, we are not children. If a change is coming for the students, we deserve to know about it. We want to work with you, but when we are cut out of the conversation we will revolt. Administration, listen to your students.